Big Barda's Black Baby Girl

Oct 02

[video]

jean-luc-gohard:

The most dangerous thing society teaches boys and men, especially white boys and men, is that their emotions are objective logic and reason and that anyone who disagrees is being irrational.

(via thatjayjustice)

ulfric-ulfprick:

godotal:

hkirkh:

Confused husky pup

He’s not expressing confusion, he’s tilting his head for better sound localization. While having an ear on each side of the head is good for lateral echolocation, tilting the head so that the ears are offset gives it vertical depth.

doG SCIENCE

ulfric-ulfprick:

godotal:

hkirkh:

Confused husky pup

He’s not expressing confusion, he’s tilting his head for better sound localization. While having an ear on each side of the head is good for lateral echolocation, tilting the head so that the ears are offset gives it vertical depth.

doG SCIENCE

(via strugglingtobeheard)

bankuei:

abagond:

soulbrotherv2:

The MTV Show That Created Hip-Hop

By Kenji Jasper
MTV Unplugged was designed primarily for rock fans who wanted to hear what their favorite artists sounded like when their instruments weren’t plugged into an amp. But that changed on May 1, 1991, when the channel aired the debut broadcast of Yo! Unplugged Rap, 60 minutes of acoustic beats to the rhyme that proved hip-hop was just as formidable with live instruments as it was with samples and breakbeats.
“[It’s like] you drink milk for 10 years and then [you have to] drink fruit punch,” A Tribe Called Quest’s Q-Tip told MTV News about being backed by Pop’s Cool Love, the LA funk-metal band that provided grooves for the set. “It’s not that the fruit is bad, but you have to get used to it.”
The show set the stage for crossover artists like Michael Franti’s Spearhead, Arrested Development, The Roots and Jay Z’s monster mashup with Linkin Park.
“During rehearsal we’d go in and tell them where we wanted to drop,” MC Lyte added in the interview, “or where we wanted [a certain song] to come in to jazz it up a little, but from the regular track.”
Starting off with a slow fade into the bass line from Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” — the centerpiece of A Tribe Called Quest’s “Can I Kick It?” — Q-Tip, Phife Dawg and Ali Shaheed Muhammad launched into a spirited performance that set the tone for the rest of the half-hour special.
[Continue reading article at OZY.]


MTV created hip-hop? 

"Columbusing" is pretty much the best new word about shit, because as far as white folks are concerned, nothing exists or matters until it becomes accessible to them.
Funny enough, though, one of the few decent white folks about hiphop, Adam Mansbach, had a pretty interesting thing to say about the shift and cultural appropriation years back…
He pointed out that initially, if you wanted to participate in hiphop, you had to go to events and house parties, which meant you had to actually treat Black folks with respect or you’d get kicked out.  This changed drastically once hiphop hits TV, because now white people could access it without ever having to interact with Black people at all, much less have to change their interaction default from shitty microaggressions and privilege to one of decency.
Of course, while we’ve got white people claiming that Miley, Iggy and Macklemore are some kind of “culmination” of hiphop with occasional nods to Eminem or Beastie Boys, it’s no surprise that they’re going to attempt to rewrite history that their own media ‘invents” all Black media as well.
The irony is, that for all of hiphop’s sampling and plays off each other’s lyrics, it is done as a sign of respect to one’s roots and sources, while the same people who accused them of theft, are the first to remove all history and context and install white faces over it.

bankuei:

abagond:

soulbrotherv2:

The MTV Show That Created Hip-Hop

By Kenji Jasper

MTV Unplugged was designed primarily for rock fans who wanted to hear what their favorite artists sounded like when their instruments weren’t plugged into an amp. But that changed on May 1, 1991, when the channel aired the debut broadcast of Yo! Unplugged Rap, 60 minutes of acoustic beats to the rhyme that proved hip-hop was just as formidable with live instruments as it was with samples and breakbeats.

“[It’s like] you drink milk for 10 years and then [you have to] drink fruit punch,” A Tribe Called Quest’s Q-Tip told MTV News about being backed by Pop’s Cool Love, the LA funk-metal band that provided grooves for the set. “It’s not that the fruit is bad, but you have to get used to it.”

The show set the stage for crossover artists like Michael Franti’s Spearhead, Arrested Development, The Roots and Jay Z’s monster mashup with Linkin Park.

“During rehearsal we’d go in and tell them where we wanted to drop,” MC Lyte added in the interview, “or where we wanted [a certain song] to come in to jazz it up a little, but from the regular track.”

Starting off with a slow fade into the bass line from Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” — the centerpiece of A Tribe Called Quest’s “Can I Kick It?” — Q-Tip, Phife Dawg and Ali Shaheed Muhammad launched into a spirited performance that set the tone for the rest of the half-hour special.

[Continue reading article at OZY.]

MTV created hip-hop? 

"Columbusing" is pretty much the best new word about shit, because as far as white folks are concerned, nothing exists or matters until it becomes accessible to them.

Funny enough, though, one of the few decent white folks about hiphop, Adam Mansbach, had a pretty interesting thing to say about the shift and cultural appropriation years back…

He pointed out that initially, if you wanted to participate in hiphop, you had to go to events and house parties, which meant you had to actually treat Black folks with respect or you’d get kicked out.  This changed drastically once hiphop hits TV, because now white people could access it without ever having to interact with Black people at all, much less have to change their interaction default from shitty microaggressions and privilege to one of decency.

Of course, while we’ve got white people claiming that Miley, Iggy and Macklemore are some kind of “culmination” of hiphop with occasional nods to Eminem or Beastie Boys, it’s no surprise that they’re going to attempt to rewrite history that their own media ‘invents” all Black media as well.

The irony is, that for all of hiphop’s sampling and plays off each other’s lyrics, it is done as a sign of respect to one’s roots and sources, while the same people who accused them of theft, are the first to remove all history and context and install white faces over it.

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

” — One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

(via bankuei)

http://navigatethestream.tumblr.com/post/98977626530/saotome-michi-spnsocks-saotome-michi-i -

saotome-michi:

spnsocks:

saotome-michi:

I leave Tumblr for half a day and then find Hong Kong all over my dash.

All I have to say is

  • I am very suspicious of people saying “stop a second Tiananmen Square Massacre happening” because wow way to conflate the two and ignore the…

It's supposed to be easy to ask for help -

crankyskirt:

crankyskirt:

but it totally isn’t. Not for me, anyway.

I’m on medical leave from work for at least the next month, and while I’m very fortunate to have health insurance, I was already cutting things close with my monthly budget, and doctors’ co-pays plus out-of-network…

[video]

Sep 27

baddiebey:

*black woman is sexual*
*black woman explicitly states that they’re doing it for themselves and nobody else*
*white feminist pulls up in their white feminist mini van blaring iggy azalea*
*adjusts their tina fey inspired frameless glasses* Ummmmmmmmm im uncomfortable with you doing that it makes me feel as if you’re pandering to the male gaze you should be more in control of your image sweetie:)

(via kyssthis16)

Sep 25

[video]

Sep 21

[video]

Sep 17

[video]

[video]

Sep 15

ethiopienne:

Submit to Contemporary Queer's second issue: Bodies.

This issue asks you to consider bodies through space and time. Your body. The bodies you like. The bodies you’d like. The bodies of your ancestors or descendants. What our bodies convey when we perform certain behaviors or don’t. What we consider “whole” and “partial.” Musculature. Skin color. Photography. Art. The definitions we apply to our bodies versus the definitions others ascribe to us. Representations and appropriations. Gender. Disease. Settler. Indigenous. What role does culture play when it comes to our bodies? What does protection mean? What are our boundaries? How do our bodies affect us? Do food and environment play significant roles? Immigration. Prison. Slavery. Trafficking. Modeling. Servitude. Commodification. Markets. Mockery. Sexuality. Beauty ideals. Virtual bodies. Physical bodies. Digital bodies. Celebrated bodies. Reviled bodies. Incarcerated bodies. Free bodies. Space. Movement. Movement through physical space. Movement through symbolic space.If you have a poetry, prose (fiction/nonfiction), essays, interviews, photo series, etc. that you think would be a great fit for this issue, keep us in mind. Follow @ConQueerZINE on Twitter and the hashtag #ConQueerBODIES if you’d like to join the ongoing discussion.

ethiopienne:

Submit to Contemporary Queer's second issue: Bodies.

This issue asks you to consider bodies through space and time. Your body. The bodies you like. The bodies you’d like. The bodies of your ancestors or descendants. What our bodies convey when we perform certain behaviors or don’t. What we consider “whole” and “partial.” Musculature. Skin color. Photography. Art. The definitions we apply to our bodies versus the definitions others ascribe to us. Representations and appropriations. Gender. Disease. Settler. Indigenous. What role does culture play when it comes to our bodies? What does protection mean? What are our boundaries? How do our bodies affect us? Do food and environment play significant roles? Immigration. Prison. Slavery. Trafficking. Modeling. Servitude. Commodification. Markets. Mockery. Sexuality. Beauty ideals. Virtual bodies. Physical bodies. Digital bodies. Celebrated bodies. Reviled bodies. Incarcerated bodies. Free bodies. Space. Movement. Movement through physical space. Movement through symbolic space.

If you have a poetry, prose (fiction/nonfiction), essays, interviews, photo series, etc. that you think would be a great fit for this issue, keep us in mind. Follow @ConQueerZINE on Twitter and the hashtag #ConQueerBODIES if you’d like to join the ongoing discussion.

Sep 14

Please help me crowd fund my rent to stay housed/fed. -

windowsintheattic:

Hey, y’all,

I’m in a major transitional period in my life. One of the things I’m phasing into is a new job (Yay! Super thankful). While I am already working, my new pay schedule is very different than what I’m used to; I won’t get paid until October 5th. I work a few side jobs in addition to my…